Jewish woman dating catholic man

“I wasn’t marrying someone because of her religion.I was marrying Sarah because she was who she was.” When they got engaged, both Sarah and Mike took interfaith marriage preparation classes, which helped with tough discussions they had about raising kids, celebrating holidays, and dealing with family dynamics.While Richards’ Ohio hometown has three Catholic churches and a majority Christian populace, once she met Levy all her plans for a “nice Catholic boy” disappeared.As they dated, the two made sure big issues like how their children would be raised or what religious traditions were important to them were discussed respectfully and resolved early on without either forgoing their faith.Respect for both of their beliefs extended into their wedding ceremony, which was led by both the priest and the rabbi.

Garcia says that while supporting these couples pastorally, the church also is concerned with making sure the Catholic in a mixed-religion marriage continues to practice his or her faith and that the couple takes seriously the Catholic party’s pledge to raise their children Catholic.“If we can get across to people that religion is not getting in the way, that religion is there to help, that makes so much more sense to me,” he says.“Marriage preparation becomes a possible moment of grace.” Despite the rise in interfaith and interchurch marriages, they’re not at an all-time high.According to CARA, the highest rate of interfaith marriages took place in the 1970s and 1980s, when young Catholics dispersed from East Coast and Midwestern cities into areas of the country where there were fewer Catholic enclaves.But as Ohio couple Richards and Levy illustrate, attraction and love can trump proximity to potential partners of the same faith.

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